Inside the Studio : Chung & Tyson

I first met Chung Tyson Workshop at The Hepworth Wakefield Christmas event, and was wowed by their unique and beautifully finished selection of desk tidies and stationery. The workshop is made up of architect-makers Ming Chung and Nick Tyson who’s practice encompasses design, construction and teaching. They are interested in the inventive use of building materials that explore qualities of hand-craft alongside digital fabrication techniques.

 They are based in Manchester in a converted turn-of-the-century Coach House and brick annexe that was self-built in 2013. The studio and workshop share a courtyard garden that allows each space a connection to the garden as well as views to each other during a working day.

The studio is a ‘clean’ space with a full width work-table and glazed roof light above - this is where any drawings and graphics are made and where books, samples, small prototypes and sofas are located.  The design process begins with a conversation that involves sketching by hand, computer drawing (although not always the case) and then making of mock-ups or prototypes. This process can flow forwards or backwards depending on the challenges of the project.

The studio is a ‘clean’ space with a full width work-table and glazed roof light above - this is where any drawings and graphics are made and where books, samples, small prototypes and sofas are located.

The design process begins with a conversation that involves sketching by hand, computer drawing (although not always the case) and then making of mock-ups or prototypes. This process can flow forwards or backwards depending on the challenges of the project.

The workshop is in the older part of the building, the Coach House with its glazed brick interior so quite a robust space for machining and typical shop tools. This is where 3-D making occurs in all its noisy, dusty and untidy glory - it is very cold in the winter but the central Morso Squirrel stove keeps things cosy.

The workshop is in the older part of the building, the Coach House with its glazed brick interior so quite a robust space for machining and typical shop tools. This is where 3-D making occurs in all its noisy, dusty and untidy glory - it is very cold in the winter but the central Morso Squirrel stove keeps things cosy.

Makers House is all about collaboration and shared exhibiting opportunities so I love to see what other makers our interviewees champion, in this case Chung and Tyson submitted two beautiful examples of other maker’s work so i have decided to bend the rules a bit and show case both of them!

A favourite made piece that we have commissioned is by artist photographer Harriet Clark @interference-art. The Coach House was documented using a large format pinhole camera using light sensitive paper to directly capture the image. There is a lovely sepia and magenta tone to the images which seem to capture the character and inhabitation of the place.

A favourite made piece that we have commissioned is by artist photographer Harriet Clark @interference-art. The Coach House was documented using a large format pinhole camera using light sensitive paper to directly capture the image. There is a lovely sepia and magenta tone to the images which seem to capture the character and inhabitation of the place.

Another favourite piece is by silversmith Anna Gordon commissioned by Wright and Wright Architects and gift for the completion of the Women’s Library in London 2001. This simple object with recessed channel detail is made from oxidised silver and gold leaf and belies the level of craftsmanship involved in its making.

Another favourite piece is by silversmith Anna Gordon commissioned by Wright and Wright Architects and gift for the completion of the Women’s Library in London 2001. This simple object with recessed channel detail is made from oxidised silver and gold leaf and belies the level of craftsmanship involved in its making.

They enjoy making use of materials from their architectural projects, in fact the desktop TIDY re-uses material from a studio apartment project in London. Furniture linoleum is a current favourite material, warm, ecological and adding a level of tactility to otherwise ordinary objects.

They enjoy making use of materials from their architectural projects, in fact the desktop TIDY re-uses material from a studio apartment project in London. Furniture linoleum is a current favourite material, warm, ecological and adding a level of tactility to otherwise ordinary objects.